Before/After: Guru Granth Sahib

I was recently commissioned to rebind a beautiful copy of the Guru Granth Sahib, the Sikh scriptures. (For more information about Sikhism and modern Sikhs in America, check out SALDEF.org) Its owner is very attached to it, and with good reason: it contains the entire text in three versions, side-by-side! The original, a transliteration of the original, and an English translation. This isn’t an easy book to replace, so he sought me out to repair it. I took one look at it and said yes. It’s beautiful!

As you can see in the images below, the book had basically split apart into two halves, with only the bookcloth at the spine holding them together. Pages on either side of the split had been damaged with continued use and were starting to come apart as well.

Click any of the photos on this page to enlarge them.

After a careful examination to make sure I knew exactly what needed doing, I cautiously disassembled the book, separating the cover from the text block (and the cover boards from the badly damaged spine). I then disassembled the text block and meticulously examined each individual signature (more than 80!) to see which ones needed repair. Here are a couple closeup before-and-after shots of this process:

Once that was finished (this was the most laborious part of the whole process, and took me several days), I resewed the text block. Since I don’t have a proper sewing frame on hand, I improvised one, as you can see below. Once done with the sewing, I moved the book into my laying press to be re-consolidated.

As a side note: You can just barely see in the right-hand photo that the press is not on my workbench. In fact, the book is so wide, it was wider than my press is tall! I worked around this by cleaning out a recycling can and carefully putting the press on top. It was tall enough that the pages were able to hang freely like normal. It did mean, however, that I couldn’t work with it on my workbench. I meant to take a photo of the setup, but appear not to have done so.

While waiting for layers of paste on the spine to dry, I worked on the cover. Here you can see a quick before/after of an edge of one of the cover boards.

Once the cover boards were ready to go, I reinforced the spine (I used two layers of Japanese kozo, a layer of unbleached linen, made-from-scratch endbands, and finally a one-on-and-two-off cardstock tube, which allows the book to open with less stress to the spine), then covered it with painted-to-match fabric. As you can just barely see in the photos below, the fabric is tucked under the cloth of the cover. In addition, I gently split the bookboard a little, so the fabric is actually inside the cardboard of the cover. This allows for much better holding strength than if I just tucked it under the fabric.

And finally, it was done!

 

All together, the hinges where the cover meets the spine are held together by two layers of linen and a layer of paper, and the thorough spine reinforcement will reduce stress on the hinges significantly. As a result, the book is much stronger than it was before.

In closing, a quick before/after comparison!

If you have a book that needs rebinding, or even just some basic repair, please get in touch! I really love repairing books.

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September’s a Big Month!

Hey, book lovers!

The blog’s been quiet, but if you follow my Instagram (or Facebook, or Tumblr) you know I’ve been busybusy, getting ready to vend at Rose City Comic Con (9/19 & 9/20) If you’ve never been, it is an amazing con. Fans of comics or of scifi/fantasy in general, it is 100% worth the price of admission ($50 for both days or $30 for one). Plus, you’ll get a chance to buy some of my blank books with comic-book covers! I am not listing them on Etsy before the con.

Other news: The super awesome Two Artsy Gals podcast had me on as a guest! We hung out and chatted about bookbinding for over an hour, and the episode is going to go live on 9/10, so be sure to check it out! (I’m sure I’ll be posting about it everywhere on the day as well, heh.) It’s a great podcast, so if you are irreverent and dig DIY/crafts, go check it out.

Here are a few pix from my Instagram feed over the last couple weeks:

Any Deadpool fans in the house? #bookbinding #bookarts #deadpool #comics

A photo posted by Ealasaid Haas (@thebookroadie) on

Stamping books with my URL, woo! #bookbinding #bookarts #selfie

A photo posted by Ealasaid Haas (@thebookroadie) on

Bruce Wayne, into the book press! He’ll be on my table at #RCCC. #bookbinding #bookarts #comics #batman

A photo posted by Ealasaid Haas (@thebookroadie) on

Getting lots done! #bookbinding #bookarts

A photo posted by Ealasaid Haas (@thebookroadie) on

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Quick Update

Hey everybody!

If you follow my Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr accounts, you know I’ve been busy bookbinding lately, even if I haven’t been blogging about it.

It’s been a trippy few months. Last month, I found and managed to buy a Hamilton type cabinet full of lead type from a fellow member of the Guild of Book Workers – lead type is a bit tricky to use in my Kwik-Print hot foil stamper, but I can do it if I’m careful, and this means I have WAY more options when stamping book covers! I’m still getting the hang of using the Kwik-Print, it’s more of an art than a science.

I’m going to be vending at Rose City Comic Con, which is next month. As in, I have about thirty days to get together a reasonable amount of stock to sell at a huge event. Thankfully, I have a bunch of materials and ideas! I’ve been binding up a storm, and will continue to do so pretty much right up to the last minute. Woo!

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Bookcloth Tutorial

I posted a tutorial on making your own bookcloth on Instagram a while back, and thought it’d be fun to offer it here, as well! (I’ve also edited it and added more commentary than I felt like typing on my phone.)

To make your own bookcloth using this method, you will need:

  • A large, clean work surface
  • Fabric
  • An iron and ironing surface
  • Japanese paper
  • Wheat paste
  • Paste brush
  • Waste paper to cover your work surface
  • Scissors
  • The measurements for how much bookcloth your project needs
  • A ruler or yardstick
  • A large, clean pane of glass (windows work great for this!)
  • A utility knife, x-acto knife, or similar
  1. Clean your work surface (in this case, my flat file downstairs).
    Bookcloth Tutorial 1
  2. Figure out how much you need. In the picture you can just barely see my book map, which is what let me know how much bookcloth I needed.
    Bookcloth Tutorial 2
  3. Cut out the amount you need (with some extra just in case).
    Also: thanks to the fabulous Xcentricities (corset.net) for the fabric! It’s unique to them and they very kindly sold me some.
    Bookcloth Tutorial 3
  4. Iron the fabric.
    Bookcloth Tutorial 4
  5. Cut Japanese paper to size. I did this by laying the fabric out on the paper and cutting around it. You’ll need about a 1″ margin on all sides. Don’t forget to line up the grain! (note: fabric grain runs parallel to the selvage, the rough edge on either side of full yards of fabric)
    Bookcloth Tutorial 5
  6. Paste time! Put the fabric face down, smooth it flat (you can spray it with water if it’s being troublesome), and paste up the paper.
    Bookcloth Tutorial 6
  7. Carefully lower paper, paste side down, onto the fabric. This is definitely the hardest part.
    Bookcloth Tutorial 7
  8. Use the pasted up margin affix to a piece of glass. A clean window works well. (Bonus: the pasted margin will keep your bookcloth from shrinking as it dries!)
    Bookcloth Tutorial 8
  9. Repeat as desired, allow to dry overnight.
    Bookcloth Tutorial 9
  10. Optional: relax outside with cute person and refreshing beverage.
    Bookcloth Tutorial 10
  11. Cut around the fabric with a sharp knife and carefully peel away. Ta-daa! Book cloth (cleaning is easiest with a sharp blade like a razor or utility knife blade – just scrape the remaining paper off the window.)
    Bookcloth Tutorial 11

And bam! Your very own custom bookcloth.

One of my favorite sources for fabric when I want an unusual pattern is Spoonflower, which is sort of like Cafepress but for fabric. They have SO MANY PATTERNS WHOA.

Good luck and have fun!

 

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Accomplishments!

I was able to take a pretty long vacation from my day job for the holidays this year, and I decided to keep roughly the same schedule but do bookbinding instead! I had a great time, and bound a ton of books. Check it out:

Accomplishments!

BOOKS COMPLETED: 19
BOOKS READY TO CASE IN: 13
BOOKS IN PROGRESS: 24

For the curious, the reason I separated “ready to case in” and “in progress” is that once a book is ready to case in, it’s almost done. The actual casing-in gets done all at once, so it’s basically a single, longish step that ends with the book in the press overnight. The steps leading up to that are many, so the in-progress books are a lot further from being done than the ready-to-case-in ones.

I’m back at my day job as of today, but I’m hoping to keep up the momentum as much as possible in the six weeks I have before I vend at Pantheacon. Wish me luck!

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Productivity!

Since I was accepted to vend at Pantheacon next year (see the Events page) I’ve been trying to up my productivity. Sometimes, though, the dayjob just takes too much out of me.

“Ealasaid, what do you do when you’re too braindead and your tremor is too bad for you to do complicated bookbinding tasks?”

Fold signatures.

So, first I grabbed one of the precut chunks of paper from when I ordered a custom-cut carton a while back. Cartons hold 1,000 parent sheets, so that’s how many are in that stack. The paper is too long, however, so I used my guillotine to cut it into two stacks of 5″x8″ sheets (bringing the total to 2,000 sheets).

Let's do this

After that, I started separating the pile into groups of four and folding them in half. You can see a small stack of already-folded signatures under that cast iron iron (yes, it literally used to be used to iron clothes. I have no idea how old it is, but it weighs a ton and that’s what I was looking for). Basically, I’d fold batches of four until I ran out, then take those signatures, stack them, put them under the iron, and divvy up another batch of sheets. Lather, rinse, repeat.

Getting rolling

In the end, I had 25 books worth of signatures (2,000 sheets into groups of four = 250 signatures, ten signatures per book makes that = 25 books).

Here’s what I ended up with:

Done

 

Next up: endpapers and punching sewing holes!

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Unboxing!

One of my favorite things is taking books out of the press the morning after I case them in. Once I remove the various protective pieces of waxed paper and the brass rods to shape the shoulders, they are all finished and look sweet!

It's time! Out of the press All finished!

These will be listed on my Etsy soon, and will also be available at the New Girl in Town Mini-Expo this weekend in Portland, Oregon!

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New Merch!

Not only am I not dead or otherwise permanently offline, I have new stuff in the Etsy shop! Check it out, y’all:

 

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PAPER

So, anybody who’s interacted with me in a bookbinding context has probably already figured out that I’m a paper geek. I love paper. Love it.

Naturally I am SUPER excited about the paper in the photo below! It’s from the fantastic Pulp & Deckle, a papermaking studio here in Portland. They graciously made me a bunch of handmade, hand-marbled papers to use as endpapers, and I am SO EXCITED.

Untitled

Pulp & Deckle papers in my thrilling newish flat file!

Look at that loveliness! They use recycled and reclaimed materials (like old sheets from thrift stores and used wrapping paper!) to make this lovely, thick, soft paper. I am smitten. I’ve already got one book in progress using a pair of these for endsheets, and I will soon have many more, I’m sure.

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Exciting News! Book Roadie blank notebooks availble at Wanderlust in PDX!

That’s right, folks! I just dropped off some of my pocket-sized blank notebooks at Wanderlust here in Portland, OR.

Wanderlust is a vintage and handmade goods shop, and they have a ton of interesting stuff to check out for holiday shopping. They’re also my first wholesale customer!

If you want one of my pocket notebooks, you don’t have to wait for my next craft fair or for me to list more on Etsy, you can drop by Wanderlust at 2804 SE Ankeny St. — but they only have a few, so get hopping if you want to have the best selection of colors!

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